CAORC Fellowship

Josephine Chaet, ACOR-CAORC Pre-Doctoral Fellow, Summer / Fall 2019

Josephine Chaet is a doctoral candidate in the anthropology department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and an ACOR-CAORC pre-doctoral fellow for the summer and fall of 2019. Prior to her current fellowship at ACOR, Josephine was a Fulbright Research Scholar in Jordan during the 2018-2019 academic year. Her research while at ACOR …

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Michael Morris, ACOR-CAORC Post-Doctoral Fellow Fall 2018

Michael Morris is an ACOR-CAORC post-doctoral fellow in fall 2018, currently working to conserve two marble Aphrodite figures found at Petra’s North Ridge Excavations conducted under ACOR Board members S. Thomas Parker and Megan Perry. After an initial polychrome study by Mark Abbe, these extraordinary figures will be conserved and exhibited in the new Petra …

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Jennifer Olmsted, ACOR-CAORC Post-Doctoral Fellow Fall 2018

Jennifer Olmsted is an ACOR-CAORC post-doctoral fellow in fall 2018. She is a Professor of Economics and Business and the Director of the Social Entrepreneurship Semester at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey. Her research while at ACOR centers on gender, displacement, and economic and social sustainability. Growing up in Beirut and witnessing the beginning …

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Mining Manuscripts of the Ottoman Archives

   Sarah Islam is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Princeton University and an ACOR-CAORC pre-doctoral fellow for 2015–2016. In order to complete her research project, which deals with the evolving historical discourse on blasphemy as an Islamic legal category, from the medieval period until the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Islam needed to painstakingly …

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Producing Extra Virginity in Jordan

Brittany Barrineau, ACOR-CAORC pre-doctoral fellow for 2016–2017, writes below about her research into the social, political, and economic forces that are transforming Jordan’s traditional but rapidly evolving olive oil industry.  The olive harvest festival in Irbid included an outdoor opening ceremony with poetry, several speakers, two dance groups, a marching band, and a small speech …

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Rana B. Khoury, CAORC Fellow at ACOR Fall 2016-17

How do regular people respond and adapt to “major structural changes that upend normal social processes?” This question is at the heart of Rana B. Khoury’s work, which explores the new “normal” that civilians in Syria have created in response to the Syrian civil war. Inspired to “tell the stories of individuals and communities experiencing …

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A Recipe for Public Archaeology in Cyprus – An ACOR Video Lecture by Dr. Andrew McCarthy

The ACOR Video Lecture Series provides  accessible discussions of new research into the past and present of Jordan and the broader Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean worlds.  This fifth video in the series, adapted from the February 2016 ACOR public lecture delivered by Dr. Andrew McCarthy, has two parts.  The first relates how the  Cyprus …

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When Bread Is More than Just Bread

Toasty and plump from having just been baked, loaves of classic khubz ‘arabī—or Arabic pita bread—come off the bakery conveyor to be bagged and then sold by the kilogram to Amman’s residents. Bakeries lie at the center of communal life in Jordan’s cities and towns. They mark daily rhythms and movements in countless neighborhoods. The …

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Understanding the New Urban Geographies of the Syrian Conflict

ACOR-CAORC Pre-Doctoral Fellow Ali Hamdan, seen here in Amman's Jabal Lweibdeh neighborhood, is studying the political geographies of Syrian exiles in two cities deeply affected by the conflict, Gaziantep in Turkey and Amman in Jordan. Jordan is a rewarding place to be a geographer. To the south and east, deserts host an array of communities …

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Jordan and the Administrative Legacy of the Umayyads

The Umayyad desert complex of Qusayra ‘Amra, one of Jordan’s famous “desert castles” (qusur), dated to the eighth century CE. Photo by Tareq Ramdan At the crossroads of numerous, sometimes overlapping and intersecting empires and civilizations, Jordan has become the final resting place for a dizzying array of historical and archaeological treasures. While dotted by …

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